Video

themysteryofgravityfalls:

It’s just like being at SDCC! Now where’s FullBars?

(via collarpoints)

Video

typette:

wickedtheory:

DEADPOOL - “Oh, F***K Me” (High Quality) - Here’s that test footage that has been popping up all over since it leaked at comic-con, featuring Ryan Reynolds as The Merc With The Mouth - in crisp, clear video! Looks so much better! Watch now before it gets taken down.

CHARACTER ANIMATIOOOOON

OH MY GOD

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tsarabella:

swimmiesofdoom:

israel bombed gaza’s zoo today.  no, hamas wasn’t there.
israel has bombed hospitals.  no, hamas wasn’t there.
israel has bombed schools.  no, hamas wasn’t there.
israel has bombed apartments, homes, and the streets.  israel has bombed the beaches.  israel has put out snipers to shoot at fleeing women and children and men.
israel is an apartheid state.
hamas doesn’t exist in a vaccuum. israel created hamas.  without israeli oppression and occupation and apartheid, there would be no hamas.
wonder woman wouldn’t stand for any of this shit.  you are not right, gal gadot, and israel.  you are not right, and you will not overcome.  you will never overcome.

#NotMyWonderWoman

tsarabella:

swimmiesofdoom:

israel bombed gaza’s zoo today.  no, hamas wasn’t there.

israel has bombed hospitals.  no, hamas wasn’t there.

israel has bombed schools.  no, hamas wasn’t there.

israel has bombed apartments, homes, and the streets.  israel has bombed the beaches.  israel has put out snipers to shoot at fleeing women and children and men.

israel is an apartheid state.

hamas doesn’t exist in a vaccuum. israel created hamas.  without israeli oppression and occupation and apartheid, there would be no hamas.

wonder woman wouldn’t stand for any of this shit.  you are not right, gal gadot, and israel.  you are not right, and you will not overcome.  you will never overcome.

#NotMyWonderWoman

(via inbetweenthelineart)

Video

Sometimes I forget that Firefly Online is a thing that is actually happening, and then some news or a new trailer will float down from the aether to remind me. This week sees both, the aether in this case being the ever-reliable Rock, Paper, Shotgun, so I figured it’d be worth sharing that here.

The news is that apparently they’re reuniting the original cast to voice their respective characters in-game, and the trailer is that video wot’s up above, featuring a few brief snippets of gameplay.

From RPS:
"The idea of Firefly Online is the same dream as the show–be a space-cowboy captain gallivanting about the wild frontier, doing missions, building a crew, and customising your Firefly-class spaceship. Which, surely, has an appeal beyond the fanbase."

Honestly, I’m… not sure how I feel about it, all things considered. Though it could be interesting, for a free-to-play browser-based game. Provided they don’t go overboard with microtransactions…

But I’ve registered for it anyway, because I am a weak-minded cretin!

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kit-kat-sb:

nablayah:

idilardayacad:

maleehaisconfused:

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

lol
didn’t know ancient egyptians looked like mayo…

RHAMSES IM CHOKING LIKE THEY DIDNT SEE THE STATUES OR NOTHING

Ok but of course the servants and thieves are black ok i see yall

This makes me so mad

kit-kat-sb:

nablayah:

idilardayacad:

maleehaisconfused:

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

lol

didn’t know ancient egyptians looked like mayo…

RHAMSES IM CHOKING LIKE THEY DIDNT SEE THE STATUES OR NOTHING

Ok but of course the servants and thieves are black ok i see yall

This makes me so mad

(via jhenne-bean)

Photoset

mybodythehandgrenade:

brinconvenient:

gailsimone:

chrishaley:

Done and done.

(Not pictured: “Butt window”, but trust me, it’s there.)

You have no idea how much this cheered me up just now.

I for one, think this is a major improvement. Look how empowered he is! And it’s relevant to the character as someone who is powered by the sun, he’d want to maximize the amount of sunlight he receives, right? It’s not like it makes sense for him to cover himself from chin to toe.
In fact, I think some strappy sandals might be an improvement.

strappy high heeled sandals would increase his height making him closer to the sun. and if wonderwoman can fight in heels it can’t be that hard, right?

(Source: thechrishaley, via yopatrick)

Text

jasjuliet replied to your post: “There and Byakugan”:

YOU SHALL NOT CHIDORI

KUNAI, YOU FOOLS!

screaming-fan-girl replied to your post: “There and Byakugan”:

You’re such a freakin’ dweeb and I love you for it you hugeantic ginormic nerd <3
:D <3 <3 <3
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lewsteph:

finally caught up on book 3 of korra. 


Well, this is just dang beautiful.

lewsteph:

finally caught up on book 3 of korra. 

Well, this is just dang beautiful.

(via yopatrick)

Text

There and Byakugan

—by Bilbo Hyūga.

Photo
lexxercise:

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:
Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.
And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:
I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).
The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.
I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.
So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point. 
After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.
Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.
Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As soon as I saw this on my dash, I knew I had to share it with you guys. I feel like it’s so easy to see successful artists and get discouraged when you’re just starting out. To think that if you don’t have the same opportunities as they do, or access to a fancy degree, or professional tools, that you’ll never get there yourself.
The path to success and happiness is different for everyone. There is no formula—no magic tool or diploma that will get you there—and it might take longer to achieve for some than others.There is no age before or after which somehow legitimizes or delegitimizes your efforts; I’m on the cusp of 30 and still trying to figure things out. But it’s so important that you find a way to do what you love and what makes you happy. Even if it never becomes your job. Even if you can’t spend more than 10 minutes on it every day. Even if it only exists on the backs of napkins and scraps of paper. Even if no one else sees it but you.
-L

lexxercise:

dresdencodak:

doggedlyjo:

dresdencodak:

Fair enough. I assume you mean when I started Dresden Codak? I’ll break down the honest-to-goodness process of the early comics:

  1. Draw comics in mechanical pencil on the back of my statistics homework (never turned in) and then ink on top of that with a micron pen.
  2. Sneak into the Honors College study room (from which I was expelled for poor grades) and use their scanner.
  3. Use a mouse and a bootleg copy of Photoshop 7 to color the pages.
  4. Upload it to my site, which at the time was flat HTML that I’d written from scratch.

And that’s it!

reblogging this for the reminder that grades and a college degree are by no means the be-all end-all of life. 

There’s some truth to this. I’d like to share some further biographical information:

I’m a college dropout. In 2006 I left school after a little over four years because I kept changing majors (physics, anthropology, computer science, then art) and it had reached a point where it was difficult for me to afford to keep going to school (I was paying my own way with various jobs).

The reason I had kept changing majors was because I was terrified that I’d picked the “wrong” career, with most of those academic decisions based around what careers seemed prestigious. I wanted to be an engineer because I liked the idea of being an engineer, then a programmer because I liked the idea of being a programmer, but I was never happy doing any of these things, and it showed. I’d always been groomed to be a good student, and for most of my career I was good at doing what I was told.

I’d always been creative, doing little projects on the side. I wrote a sci-fi novel when I was 19 (never shared it), some poems in physics class, and even some fake news stories about Popeye before I was kicked off the university paper. I also made films with friends for many years. I was told these were “good hobbies,” that once I became a respected and financially stable engineer/programmer/scientist, that I could then do what made me happy on the side. A nervous breakdown during my college career, however, made it clear that “waiting to be happy” was a psychologically unstable strategy. I couldn’t wait for someone else to grant me permission to do what I wanted with my life.

So, in 2005, during a statistics class that I would eventually fail, I started drawing Dresden Codak. I hadn’t seriously drawn in many years, but it’s something you don’t totally lose. They were pretty bad drawings, but I didn’t care. I enjoyed it and decided that doing what I really liked to do now was better than hoping I could do it later. I wasn’t looking for a career at the time, I just realized how much I loved making comics and knew that I should do whatever I could to keep making them. It took about a year for me to decided that being a cartoonist was what I really wanted. I changed my major to art briefly, but eventually accepted that paying for a degree wasn’t something that was going to help me at that point.

After that, in 2006, I took a chance and dropped out. I worked an office job full time during the day while drawing Dresden Codak full time at night. I slept about 3 hours a night, but it didn’t matter. I was doing what I wanted, and it kept me going. Then, toward the end of 2007 I found out, through Topatoco, that I had enough readers to justify selling some merchandise. To my genuine surprise, as soon as we put the store up, I was making more money than my office job (which I promptly quit). From there I packed up, moved out of Alabama and never looked back.

Dresden Codak has been my full-time job ever since. It’s let me travel the country and meet amazing people while making a pretty comfortable living, but most importantly I get to do what I enjoy more than anything else. Ever since, I make all of my life decisions based on maximizing what I really want to do, and so far it’s served me well.

Don’t interpret this as an anti-education/college story or anything like that. I just think often we expect success if we do X, Y and Z, when in reality such a thing can’t be reliably handed to you by an authority. Start doing what you want to do now, because life’s far too short to wait around to be happy.

As soon as I saw this on my dash, I knew I had to share it with you guys. I feel like it’s so easy to see successful artists and get discouraged when you’re just starting out. To think that if you don’t have the same opportunities as they do, or access to a fancy degree, or professional tools, that you’ll never get there yourself.

The path to success and happiness is different for everyone. There is no formulano magic tool or diploma that will get you thereand it might take longer to achieve for some than others.There is no age before or after which somehow legitimizes or delegitimizes your efforts; I’m on the cusp of 30 and still trying to figure things out. But it’s so important that you find a way to do what you love and what makes you happy. Even if it never becomes your job. Even if you can’t spend more than 10 minutes on it every day. Even if it only exists on the backs of napkins and scraps of paper. Even if no one else sees it but you.

-L