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DA:I Companions

(Source: leftforbed, via isaia)

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isaia:

YES BUT CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING-

(livestream doodles -thanks for watching!
my take on some certain character designs)  

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sleepingjuliette:

Doodles from yesterday

Awesome! :D

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kalidraws:

RYE
My bread baking bone breaking badass for Jenn Woodall’s FIGHT! zine!
Because nothing beats some hot ‘n crusty bread.

I made the gif just for kicks, but it’s wonky in places because it took waaaay longer than I planned for and I had to stop! Overall though, this has been probably one of the funnest pieces for me to draw. Definitely influenced by my everlasting love of Kiki’s Delivery Service & not-so-secret desire to live in a bakery. I wanna do more food-themed fighters!

Prints available from my Inprnt store.

I LOVE THIS SO MUCH!

(via sleepingjuliette)

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isaia:

coelasquid:

dailydot:

Assassin’s Creed fail reveals how sexist animation standards are failing real women,
This is the same gorgeously animated, acclaimed franchise that devotes an entire subset of game play to tree-climbing. Swinging from limb to limb high above the incredibly detailed world? High on the priority list of Assassin’s Creed features. Putting a single woman into an active role in the game? Nah.
Earlier this year, the lead animator of Frozen protested that Disney's 3-D animation software literally didn’t possess the ability to make women’s faces look distinguishable from one another.
This is the same studio that employed a visual effects team of over 40 people in order to design the unique properties of snowflakes. Literally, the women of Tangled and Frozen were less distinguishable to Disney animation software than a pile of snow.
The tangle of issues and layers of sexism that contribute to this situation is overwhelming, but at the core is the fundamentally flawed way women are portrayed in comics, animation, and gaming: a feedback loop of sexual objectification and industry complacence.  
When you perpetuate the idea, across various art-based mediums, that women in drawn art, comics, and animation must and should look and move with flowy, exaggerated gestures, graceful movements, and hips, chest, and ass thrust forward in order to pander to the male gaze at all times, then you make it easier, later on, to use your own sexist animation and art standards as an excuse for why you don’t have more women.
[READ MORE]
We take you on a visual walk-through of the gaming industry and animation culture’s resistance to making women look, act, and move like human beings.

I know that this argument is done to death and this article makes a lot of claims I take issue with (the “faces of the women in Frozen” point is completely skewing the original quote it’s working with but that’s not a debate I want to get into right now), but I think a lot of people who defend the way women are consistently portrayed in absurd, posed, sexualized ways don’t understand what goes on behind the scenes.
The arguments always seem to be “That’s her personality, that’s the way she likes to dress, it’s physically possible for a woman to move like that if she wanted to, women just move differently than men” and so on and so on. And that’s true to a degree -BUT- the thing they conveniently forget is that everything they’re seeing on screen is a conscious decision made, approved, executed, and revised by an entire team of artists and marketing personnel. In many cases women aren’t portrayed the way they are out of a deep respect for the carefully constructed personality of the character, it’s because that’s how the people making it think women are supposed to act and look to make them as appealing as possible.
I’ve been in this industry for more than half a decade now, and I consistently see so much more control placed on how we’re allowed to portray women than men in most cases. They are not allowed to show the full emotional spectrum male characters are, in particular they’re not allowed to be angry and expressions of anger are revised to be sad, placid, or flirty. We’re not supposed to distort their features the same way we do with male characters. They have smaller, tighter, more restrictive outfits with stricter rules about how much of their body we’re allowed to see and how they have to hold their legs, so they’re given a much more restricted range of motion. It can feel like being handed a tool kit with half of the contents missing, we aren’t given the opportunity to make the female characters as fun and endearing as the male ones because we’re only allowed to make them a fraction as emotional and active so that they don’t alienate the audience that only wants to see the same sexy, depersonalized women they’ve been trained to expect.
And this isn’t just me saying this, it’s a fairly common complaint I see with character designers and other artists in that area. I remember attending a character design panel at FanExpo one year, I forget who was running it but he was kind of a gruff, grumpy bikery-looking video game design guy. At one point he just flat-out said “I’m so sick for drawing women in chainmail bikinis”. Everyone seemed kind of surprised to hear a remark like that because hey, that sounds like living the dream. But it’s true, it just feels like reinventing the wheel over and over because every client wants the same thing.

Kelly Turnbull keeps it real

isaia:

coelasquid:

dailydot:

Assassin’s Creed fail reveals how sexist animation standards are failing real women,

This is the same gorgeously animated, acclaimed franchise that devotes an entire subset of game play to tree-climbing. Swinging from limb to limb high above the incredibly detailed world? High on the priority list of Assassin’s Creed features. Putting a single woman into an active role in the game? Nah.

Earlier this year, the lead animator of Frozen protested that Disney's 3-D animation software literally didn’t possess the ability to make women’s faces look distinguishable from one another.

This is the same studio that employed a visual effects team of over 40 people in order to design the unique properties of snowflakes. Literally, the women of Tangled and Frozen were less distinguishable to Disney animation software than a pile of snow.

The tangle of issues and layers of sexism that contribute to this situation is overwhelming, but at the core is the fundamentally flawed way women are portrayed in comics, animation, and gaming: a feedback loop of sexual objectification and industry complacence.  

When you perpetuate the idea, across various art-based mediums, that women in drawn art, comics, and animation must and should look and move with flowy, exaggerated gestures, graceful movements, and hips, chest, and ass thrust forward in order to pander to the male gaze at all times, then you make it easier, later on, to use your own sexist animation and art standards as an excuse for why you don’t have more women.

[READ MORE]

We take you on a visual walk-through of the gaming industry and animation culture’s resistance to making women look, act, and move like human beings.

I know that this argument is done to death and this article makes a lot of claims I take issue with (the “faces of the women in Frozen” point is completely skewing the original quote it’s working with but that’s not a debate I want to get into right now), but I think a lot of people who defend the way women are consistently portrayed in absurd, posed, sexualized ways don’t understand what goes on behind the scenes.

The arguments always seem to be “That’s her personality, that’s the way she likes to dress, it’s physically possible for a woman to move like that if she wanted to, women just move differently than men” and so on and so on. And that’s true to a degree -BUT- the thing they conveniently forget is that everything they’re seeing on screen is a conscious decision made, approved, executed, and revised by an entire team of artists and marketing personnel. In many cases women aren’t portrayed the way they are out of a deep respect for the carefully constructed personality of the character, it’s because that’s how the people making it think women are supposed to act and look to make them as appealing as possible.

I’ve been in this industry for more than half a decade now, and I consistently see so much more control placed on how we’re allowed to portray women than men in most cases. They are not allowed to show the full emotional spectrum male characters are, in particular they’re not allowed to be angry and expressions of anger are revised to be sad, placid, or flirty. We’re not supposed to distort their features the same way we do with male characters. They have smaller, tighter, more restrictive outfits with stricter rules about how much of their body we’re allowed to see and how they have to hold their legs, so they’re given a much more restricted range of motion. It can feel like being handed a tool kit with half of the contents missing, we aren’t given the opportunity to make the female characters as fun and endearing as the male ones because we’re only allowed to make them a fraction as emotional and active so that they don’t alienate the audience that only wants to see the same sexy, depersonalized women they’ve been trained to expect.

And this isn’t just me saying this, it’s a fairly common complaint I see with character designers and other artists in that area. I remember attending a character design panel at FanExpo one year, I forget who was running it but he was kind of a gruff, grumpy bikery-looking video game design guy. At one point he just flat-out said “I’m so sick for drawing women in chainmail bikinis”. Everyone seemed kind of surprised to hear a remark like that because hey, that sounds like living the dream. But it’s true, it just feels like reinventing the wheel over and over because every client wants the same thing.

Kelly Turnbull keeps it real

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arst:

Langit for warm-up!hrrrmmm still not sure about her knee high sneakers/boots thing… well tbh stil not sure how to go about the whole design in the story. like, it’s gonna be scifi slice of life/adventure but i suck at drawing scifi things… am i going to do clean or grimy scifi aesthetic? ?? idk maaannn world building is hard ; v ;

I love this design and I am really excited to see more of this story/world :O

arst:

Langit for warm-up!
hrrrmmm still not sure about her knee high sneakers/boots thing… well tbh stil not sure how to go about the whole design in the story. like, it’s gonna be scifi slice of life/adventure but i suck at drawing scifi things… am i going to do clean or grimy scifi aesthetic? ?? idk maaannn world building is hard ; v ;

I love this design and I am really excited to see more of this story/world :O

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superhappy:

krudman:

onslaughtsix:

dbsharpy:

lovelymidnamage:

libbykeppen:

wingiestbird:

Hi guys! I’m going to explain something about animation which will hopefully change your minds about this picture.

(from The Animator’s Survival Kit by Richard Williams)

In order to effectively convey movement, the animator has to use a line of action for key poses - the most prominent type being a C-curve. To make moves readable, the animator will reverse the C-curve with each pose, and tie each of those together with an S-curve.

Smash Bros is a fast-paced game, so the line of action needs to be very exaggerated to communicate the movement. To do this, some parts of the character need to be broken. The pose in this image is something you’d see for less than a second, so I highly doubt they’re trying to go for eye candy with it.

This part of the Nintendo Direct shows just how fast Samus’s movements are. Each pose is hardly discernible at this speed - even when the camera is zoomed in on Samus, it’s hard to see how broken her anatomy is. However, her moves remain readable.

Another thing to keep in mind is that Samus isn’t the only character that breaks. Every character in Smash Bros has exaggerated movement - some of them even have body parts that grow really big to give punches or kicks extra oomph!

Incredible flexibility as demonstrated by Shiek!

A massive Charizard hand resulting in a very distorted Wii Fit Trainer!

Yoshi is going too fast!

If this were a rendered promotional image like a poster, I’d understand pointing out the flaws in her anatomy. However, this is an in-game screenshot, and saying that it’s wrong to pose her like this is telling the animators to not do their jobs.

THANK YOU

Thank you indeed.

Excellently said.

PROTIP: Animation needs to be fluid and move sometimes in fucked up ways for it to do what it needs to do.

If everyone is on-model all the time you get the static flash animation bullshit like Family Guy and most Adult Swim cartoons. (I’m not saying those are bad cartoons but they are typically not animated well, on purpose.)

This defense would work more if this were not a stationary pose and a key pose. It’s clearly not an image of some one in movement, taking damage, or doing heavy acting. Smash Bros is known for having people with fists that grow by multiple degrees to add more “oomph” to a punch, and characters that bend in in unbelievable ways to make it really feel like they’ve taken a hit, yes. This is some one kneeling down and firing a pistol and requires none of that.

The above left image is the proper stance for holding a pistol as seen in a normal human being. The above right is a trace and edit of Samus’s pose. Modified to remove broken joints and you can sell a little less of her breasts now. The silhouette is still in tact, the line of action is just as strong, and it’s a more believable pose.

simple fixes: get rid of her pointless high heels, lower her shoulder instead of rising it so you can see her breasts (which is needless in either example), and bring her legs in closer together. This changes little while fixing a lot, and her front leg gives her a better platform to operate acrobatics.

Again, no one is debating crazy inbetweens having broken anatomy. Everyone is debating a pose nintendo chose to showcase as her pose she fires her pistol at which is broken and needless. Animation is something to consider, yes, but we’re not talking inbetweens here.

thank you Scott.

and I know a bit about line of action myself, and I’m pretty sure it doesn’t mean you can put the character in any dumbass pose you want as long as you can draw the letter “C” through it.

image

"it doesn’t mean you can put the character in any dumbass pose you want as long as you can draw the letter “C” through it."

Perfect.

(Source: supercargautier)

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jnwiedle:

Chelsea Saunders, AKA PIXELATEDCROWN commissioned me to do this character-illo of her character, Roe, from her game that is currently in development! Chelsea is an incredibly skilled indie game dev, so please check out her work!!!
If you’re interested in a commission, please check out my commission info here!

jnwiedle:

Chelsea Saunders, AKA PIXELATEDCROWN commissioned me to do this character-illo of her character, Roe, from her game that is currently in development! Chelsea is an incredibly skilled indie game dev, so please check out her work!!!

If you’re interested in a commission, please check out my commission info here!

(Source: jnwiedle)

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jigokuen:

An Ellie drawing! Last of Us was by far one of my favorite games of 2013! I played it through twice, and I especially loved Ellie. I haven’t done fan art of Last of Us ever, so I felt like it was time. 
I post a lot of stuff on my instagram, like process videos and other such things! My username is @mingjuechen.

jigokuen:

An Ellie drawing! Last of Us was by far one of my favorite games of 2013! I played it through twice, and I especially loved Ellie. I haven’t done fan art of Last of Us ever, so I felt like it was time. 

I post a lot of stuff on my instagram, like process videos and other such things! My username is @mingjuechen.

(via isaia)

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ontarom:

If a videogame developer ever tells you they “didn’t show the females of that alien species because they would look awkward”, what they’re really saying is “we’re stupid and sexist and can’t conceive of a female character without a pretty face, boobs and ass, please kick us in the groin, we deserve pain”

(via elfgrove)